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Driving in-Rain

Even the lightest of rain showers can make the road surface slick and slippery as the water mixes with oil and rubber dust.
On water covered surfaces your car can hydroplance. That's when your tires ride on top of the water like a water ski. The faster you go the more likely you are to hydroplane, but this dangerous effect can occur at low speeds too.
Travel more slowly when the road is wet.
Be prepared for loss of steering control especially around corners and curves. Brake before entering the curves.
Make sure your tires have ample tread depth and maintain the correct air pressure.
Be sure your windshield wipers are working efficiently and you have plenty of washer fluid. Carrying extra can be very beneficial during the winter.
Make sure your lights are on and clean.
I know that splash and spray from trucks can be a worry. Recent improvements in vehicle design are helping and the industry is working with truck manufacturers to reduce the effect even more. In the meantime keep extra distance, and your windshield wipers on when other traffic is around.

(This driving tip is from the Partners in Safety booklet, which was published by the Ontario Trucking Association. 

Passing Trucks

Pay close attention to truck turn signals. Never pass on the right or squeeze in beside a truck to turn right at an intersection. Turning a large truck to the right is a tricky job. Sometimes a truck will move to the left before turning right to avoid running the trailer on to the curb. Sometimes corners are so sharp that a truck trailer must go over the curb to complete a right turn.
Before passing a truck on the highway check the traffic front and rear.
Indicate that you are going to pass.
When you see the way is clear be decisive and make your pass as quickly and safely as possible. Trucks have to shift through as many as 15 gears to reach highway speeds, and take longer to stop than your car.
Be patient when you want to overtake. Trucks are long, and greater distance and time are needed to pass safely.
When you move into the passing lane, be aware that large trucks can cause turbulence. This is most noticeable when you pass the gap between the cab and trailer and immediately after you pass the truck. Don't cut in, or slow down after passing.
Be sure to signal turns well in advance. Signal lights are to alert other drivers what you intend to do. Don't wait until you start to pull out or overtake before activating your signals. You could cause a serious collision.

(This driving tip is from the Partners in Safety booklet, which was published by the Ontario Trucking Association.  Expert instructors of the DSAO have carefully vetted all of these tips.)

Preventing Skids

A skid is usually caused by the driver's failure to react in good time and by driving too fast for road conditions.
Any sudden steering, braking or accelerating action is dangerous on a slippery surface.
Give yourself time to react. Look ahead and read the road conditions.
Because someone else is foolish enough to drive fast, there's no reason for you to be misled into thinking the conditions are safe.
If you have a car with manual transmission, shift gears before you reach the upgrade of a slippery hill. Shifting halfway up may cause the wheels to spin.

(This driving tip is from the Partners in Safety booklet, which was published by the Ontario Trucking Association.  Expert instructors of the DSAO have carefully vetted all of these tips.)

Handling Skids

A skid is the loss of tire traction. It may be caused by inappropriate use of steering brakes or accelerator.
The best way to learn to handle skids and other emergency driving techniques is under controlled conditions with a qualified instructor. Courses may be available in your area.
Here are some basic rules that every driver should know.
When you start to skid:
- Release the brake; - Take your foot off the pedal; - Depress the clutch pedal or shift to neutral quickly. - Look where you want to go and steer where you want to go.
If you can't recover steering control, and the car start to rotate, hit the brakes as hard as you can and stay on them. It will continue to rotate but in one direction only and others will stand a better chance of avoiding you. You should keep your foot hard on the brake until the car stops.

(This driving tip is from the Partners in Safety booklet, which was published by the Ontario Trucking Association.  Expert instructors of the DSAO have carefully vetted all of these tips.)